Archive of material between Nobel Laureate Francis Crick and Meyer Friedman
Archive of material between Nobel Laureate Francis Crick and Meyer Friedman
Archive of material between Nobel Laureate Francis Crick and Meyer Friedman
Crick correspondence archive

Archive of material between Nobel Laureate Francis Crick and Meyer Friedman

New York: Basic Books, Inc. 1988. First Edition. The archive includes: 1) Francis Crick INSCRIBED 1st edition of his book "What Mad Pursuit" dated October 1988 2) A check to Francis Crick dated 11/3/88 in payment for the book, ENDORSED by Crick on the back. 3) August 18, 1993 TLS (typed letter signed) signed "Francis" indicating he had no information about the 2 kinds of reprints available for his 1953 paper, and suggesting that the writer contact Jim Watson or Maurice Wilkins "in case they can remember". And finally, 4) a TLS signed "Francis H. Crick" giving the writer permission to publish a photograph the writer had taken of Crick in the late 1980s when they were visiting. The book is in Very Good condition, the letters in Fine condition noting folds for mailing, and the check in Very Good condition noting a paperclip impression on one side, and a crease for mailing in the middle. In each case, Crick's signature is clean, bold and legible. Very Good. Boards. [14270]


The Discovery of the Structure of DNA remains one of the most significant discoveries of the 20th century. Francis Crick, James Watson, Rosalind Franklin and RG Gosling all had a significant hand in the discovery. Watson, Crick, and Wilkins were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1962 for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nuclear acids and its significance for information transfer in living material.

This archive contains correspondence between Francis Crick and Meyer Friedman. Meyer Friedman is probably best known as the co-developer the theory of the "Type A" behavior, and who opened up the field of inquiry into the mind-heart (or mind-body) connection that has become a part of our popular culture. In 1988 Crick sent Meyer a copy of his autobiography, "What Mad Pursuit." Friedman responded with a check: "I admit I also sent him the check to get his signature on its reverse side. I was fortunate." The endorsed check he kept. Later Meyer asked Crick about offprints, and still later for permission to publish his photograph. A nice grouping, and worthwhile addition to any collection of 20th century medicine.

It is worth noting that the two scientists couldn't be more different in approach. Meyer looked at mind-body, or the macro or "top-down" of how we work as humans. Crick looked at the micro, or "inside-out" of how we work. Even given that separation in approaches, Friedman realized how important Crick's work was to become and sought to collect some material for himself.

Price: $2,750.00