Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article
WITH three original photographic plates

Women's Work in Astronomy at Harvard WITH the the three original spectrographs which illustrated the article

Boston, Massachusetts: New England Magazine Corporation 1892. First Edition. [1]-16 (prelims plus ads), [6], [139]-272, [2] + 19-64 (ads). The complete issue of the New England Magazine for April 1892. With original buff wrappers printed in red and black. Red spine lettering faded. Wear to the extremities, still a sound copy. Very Good. Wraps. [26776]


This issue contains an extensive article on pp 165-176 on women's work in astronomy at the Harvard College Observatory. The article is very interesting, noting that women have been involved inthree primary types of work: a) computing, based on the work of others, b) original deductions (not necessarily star-work), and 3) the Henry Draper Memorial work (a fund set up by Mrs. Anna Palmer Draper "in honor of her husband Dr. Henry Draper, who was a pioneer in the work of photographing stellar spectra."

It notes that women had been involved at Harvard for some 20 years as computers, and paid on the same basis as men who were doing similar work in other departments.

The balance of the article discusses the Henry Draper Memorial work, showing the rooms in which the women work, discussing the work done, and illustrating some of the photographic images the women routinely examine.

This article is supplemented by what we believe are three photographic plates (if not exact, then very similar) provided to the magazine in order to illustrate the article. The plates are milk glass, with photographic emulsion on one side, framed in oak. Shining a light from behind illuminates the image, much as the women working on the process would have. These plates are rare in the marketplace, most residing in institutitional collections.

The first plate is labelled (in the image) "Spectrum of Beta Aurigae"[ a variable star in Auriga constellation ] and includes two spectrums, one dated 1889, Dec. 30d 17h. 6 G.M.T. 1889, the other Dec. 31d. 11h. 5 G.M.T.".
The second plate is not labelled [and is not a spectrum but rather, we think, a grouping of stars which moved during the exposure].
The third is labelled "Peculiar Spectra" and contains six spectra on the plate, each identified.

Provenance: Skinner auction 2314, Lot 680 (2005) - auctions stickers left in place on objects.

Price: $750.00

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