The Discovery of Radium. Address by Madame M. Curie at Vassar College May 14, 1921. Ellen S. Richards Monographs no. 2 Published by Vassar College. Madam M. Curie.
The Discovery of Radium. Address by Madame M. Curie at Vassar College May 14, 1921. Ellen S. Richards Monographs no. 2 Published by Vassar College

The Discovery of Radium. Address by Madame M. Curie at Vassar College May 14, 1921. Ellen S. Richards Monographs no. 2 Published by Vassar College

[ Poughkeepsie, New York ]: [ Vassar College ] 1921. First Edition. 2 leaves plus wrappers, stapled. With facsimile inscription on cover and photomechanically reproduced image of Curie tipped in to rear inside wrapper. Some spotting, folded as if for mailing. Good. Wraps. [27715]


Madame Curie "conferred a special honor upon Vassar College by delivering in the chapel on the evening of May fourteenth the only extended address which she made in this country. In a simple, straightforward way she told the story of her great achievement." The address was printed and circulated "among the members of the college". “Marie Sk odowska Curie, born Maria Salomea Sk odowska (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934), was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, is the first person and the only woman to win the Nobel prize twice, and is the only person to win the Nobel Prize in two different scientific fields. She was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.” (wiki)

The Nobel Prize in Physics 1903 was divided, one half awarded to Antoine Henri Becquerel "in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by his discovery of spontaneous radioactivity", the other half jointly to Pierre Curie and Marie Curie, née Sklodowska "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel."

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1911 was awarded to Marie Curie, née Sklodowska "in recognition of her services to the advancement of chemistry by the discovery of the elements radium and polonium, by the isolation of radium and the study of the nature and compounds of this remarkable element."

Price: $150.00