Editing, Control and Computing of Job Pay Time with the UNIVAC 120 Punched-card Computer. Remington Rand Univac.
Editing, Control and Computing of Job Pay Time with the UNIVAC 120 Punched-card Computer
Editing, Control and Computing of Job Pay Time with the UNIVAC 120 Punched-card Computer
No copies in OCLC

Editing, Control and Computing of Job Pay Time with the UNIVAC 120 Punched-card Computer

New York, NY: Remington Rand Univac Division of Sperry Rand Corporation [ after 1955 ]. First Edition. [2],41 pages. Comb bound with red, black and white printed wrappers. Previous owner name (Joseph Lawrence Hyer) on "title page" Near Fine. Comb. [27882]


Code U1017 on rear cover (presumably the UNIVAC part number for this manual). Joseph Lawrence Hyer was employed by Sperry Univac as a systems analyst for 35 years (obituary). What we might call in modern parlance a detailed application note - but since computers were so new in use, the concept had to be spelled out in great detail. What needed done, when, and how long it might take. In retrospect it looks bulky, in-elegant, and slow - but at the time it was a real time saver, and could significantly reduce labor costs.

"The Sperry UNIVAC division has its origins in the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation (EMCC), founded in 1946 by J. Presper Eckert and John W. Mauchly, who, under contract with the US Army's Ordnance Department, developed Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer (ENIAC), the first electronic digital computer. Shortly after the construction of ENIAC, the firm began improving on the ENIAC design, which led to the creation of the Binary Automatic Computer (BINAC), and then the Universal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC), the first commercial digital computer. In 1950, Eckert and Mauchly sold their firm to Remington Rand, Inc, a major manufacturer of business machines, who continued development of the UNIVAC system. The first UNIVAC was delivered in March 1951 and the following year CBS television used a UNIVAC to predict the outcome of the 1952 presidential election. That same year, Remington Rand acquired Engineering Research Associates (ERA), a Minneapolis-based computer-development firm, and ERA and EMCC were consolidated to form the UNIVAC Division of Remington Rand.

In 1955, Remington Rand merged with the Sperry Corporation, and the UNIVAC Division was retained as part of the newly formed Sperry Rand Corporation. Sperry-UNIVAC operated two separate UNIVAC engineering facilities, one in Philadelphia and the other in Minneapolis-St. Paul, each producing different lines of UNIVAC computer systems. Development of commercial, scientific, and business systems was headed by the Philadelphia facility, with St. Paul focusing on government and military computers. In 1962, the Philadelphia facility moved to nearby Blue Bell, PA, and became the UNIVAC Division World Headquarters and the UNIVAC Engineering Center (UEC). " (Hagley Accession 1985.261 historical note)

Rare, with no copies in OCLC as of this writing.

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