[Classics] De legibus Libri Tres. Recensuit, ac Petr Victorii, Paul Manucii, Jo. Camerarii, Dion. Lambini, et Fulvii Ursini Notis suas adjecit Joannes Davisius, Coll. Regin. Cantab. Praeses. Accedit Hadriani Turnebi Commentarius. Editio Secunda. M. Tullii Ciceronis, Joannes Davisius, Marcus Tullius Cicero, John Davies.
[Classics] De legibus Libri Tres. Recensuit, ac Petr Victorii, Paul Manucii, Jo. Camerarii, Dion. Lambini, et Fulvii Ursini Notis suas adjecit Joannes Davisius, Coll. Regin. Cantab. Praeses. Accedit Hadriani Turnebi Commentarius. Editio Secunda.

[Classics] De legibus Libri Tres. Recensuit, ac Petr Victorii, Paul Manucii, Jo. Camerarii, Dion. Lambini, et Fulvii Ursini Notis suas adjecit Joannes Davisius, Coll. Regin. Cantab. Praeses. Accedit Hadriani Turnebi Commentarius. Editio Secunda.

Cantabrigiae [ Cambridge ]: Typis Academicis Excudebat J. Bentham, Impenis Gul. Thurlborourn … et J. & P. Knapton 1745. 8vo., pp. [iv], 425, [426] blank, [427-428] ads; handsome and contemporary full vellum, lightly soiled and darkened, especially at spine; ex-library label and call numbers to spine; ex-library stamps and markings to top edge, front pastedown, title leaf, and p. [iii]; library pocket and bar code label to rear endpapers; else a good, sound reader’s copy. Properly withdrawn. Good. Vellum. [27982]


Second edition of the John Davies translation. Of this edition Didman writes that he “believes” it to be designated the “Edit. Opt.” (best edition). “Such are the editions of various portions of the philosophical works of Cicero by Dr. Davies. They are justly popular impressions; and the best editions of them form parts of a complete set of the Variorum Cicero in octavo.”

"The De Legibus (On the Laws) is a dialogue written by Marcus Tullius Cicero during the last years of the Roman Republic. It bears the same name as Plato’s famous dialogue, The Laws. Unlike his previous work De re publica, in which Cicero felt compelled to set the action in the times of Scipio Africanus Minor, Cicero wrote this work as a fictionalized dialogue between himself, his brother Quintus and their mutual friend Titus Pomponius Atticus. The dialogue begins with the trio taking a leisurely stroll through Cicero's familial estate at Arpinum and they begin to discuss how the laws should be. Cicero uses this as a platform for expounding on his theories of natural law of harmony among the classes." (wikipedia)

Price: $275.00