ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988.
ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988
ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988
ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988
ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988
ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988

ENERGY: Energy = MC2 ... The Michigan Computer consortium Magazine - a substantial but incomplete run of 45 issues from Oct 1983 through May 1988

East Lansign, MI: The Michigan Computer Consortium Oct 1983-May 1988. An incomplete run of the Michigan Computer Consortium Magazine ENERGY. Formats and issues listed below. All are stapled wrappers in various colors, most with mailing labels (Kruse Company, Lansing MI) on rear panel. 28 issues of the large format, and 17 of the later smaller format issues (45 issues total). ISSN: 0740-2759

Format: 8 1/2 x 11 inches. Stapled self-wrappers (pagination includes wrappers). Dennis C. Cullinan, Editor
Oct 1983 - 36 pages (no price)
Nov 1983 - 24 pages, Preston cartoon on cover, $1 cover price starts
Dec 1983 - 32 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Jan 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Feb 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover $1.50 cover price starts
Mar 1984 - 32 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Apr 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
May 1984 - 40 pages, Computer Faire issue
Jun 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Jul 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover (stained)
Aug 1984 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Sep 1984 - 20 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Oct 1984 - 20 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Dec 1984 - 24 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Jan 1985 - 20 pages
Feb 1985 - 16 pages
Mar 1985 - 20 pages, "jt" cover illustration
Apr 1985 - 24 pages
May 1985 - 24 pages
Jul/Aug 1985 - 24 pages
Sept 1985 - 24 pages
Oct 1985 - 28 pages
Nov 1985 - 28 pages
Dec 1985 - 28 pages
Jan 1986 - 28 pages, Preston cartoon on cover
Feb 1986 - 32 pages
Mar 1986 - 28 pages
May 1986 - 28 pages (Mid-Michgan Computer Show)

Format: 6 3/4 x 8 /12 inches. Stapled self-wrappers (pagination includes wrappers). Erin Sweeney, editor
June 1986 - 20 pages.
Jul 1986 - 20 pages.
Aug 1986 - 20 pages
Sep 1986 - 24 pages
Oct 1986 - 20 pages. Cartoon by Ginny
Nov 1986 - 24 pages.
Dec 1986 - 20 pages. Cartoon by Ginny
Feb 1987 - 16 pages.
Mar 1987 - 24 pages.
Apr 1987 - 20 pages.
May 1987 - 24 pages
Jun 1987 - 24 pages.

Format: 6 3/4 x 8 /12 inches. Stapled self-wrappers (pagination includes wrappers). Wendy Spencer, editor
Sep 1987 - 24 pages
Nov 1987 - 24 pages
Jan 1988 - 32 pages
Mar/Apr 1988 - [22] pages.

Format: 6 3/4 x 8 /12 inches. Stapled wrappers. Tom Eddy, editor
May 1988 - 20 pages plus wrappers. cover price still $1.50. Very Good. Wraps. [28351]


It is nearly impossible to provide a comprehensive flavor for this monthly magazine's contents in today's computer terms. These magazines go back to an era when the internet as we know it wasn't, access to shared online data was through free local or costly long-distance bulletin boards, modems supported 45.5-300 and if you were lucky 1200 baud speeds, and information about what was happening in the personal computer field was pretty fragmented. Much of the discovery (learning) happened in local user groups who shared ideas, enthusiasms, hacks and techniques among themselves. Computers were new, and exciting. Businesses providing support, new software and hardware, and supplies were blinking into existence every day all over the country as this new phenomenon took hold of everyone's imagination (and blinking out just as quickly if they didn't stock the right stuff). It was a heady time to be a techie.

What follows is a fairly detailed look at the contents of the first issue in this grouping (Oct 1983) to give you a flavor of what they are. The production values of both articles and advertisements varies wildly throughout. It is quite fun (having lived through this time period myself) to recognize certain dot-matrix printers, amateur layout techniques, and references to computers I've not seen in many many years.

The issue explains that "we are now in a combined format with CMTUG and M3G. This did not happen overnight! The planning began last May [1982] after the Computer Faire. We first formed the Michigan Computer Consortium (MC2). This was intended as an umbrella organization for any existing club that wanted to join. The two primary functions of this umbrella are to provide a basis for planning the next Computer | Faire and to share a bulk email permit. In an effort to bring about more cooperation between clubs and to disseminate additional information about computers, it was decided that the three founding members of MC2 would move toward the production of a joint newsletter. Last month [Sept 1983], CMTUG and M3G produced a joint newsletter. This month, you will note that CHAOS has joined this great effort. It should be noted that each club has the option of printing their own newsletter at any given time, if this newsletter ceases to meet the needs of its members..." The President's Report (by Ike Hudson) goes on to discuss the mechanics of needing articles from member clubs, the suggested editorial / submission process, etc.

Contents include attempts (much like speculation on Apple computers today) to predict what Atari's next move is, and notes that CP/M "is coming soon from Atari" and talks about the Atari 400 through 1400XL. It also includes a 2 1/2 page article introducing word processing, reports on a fundraising auction, hardware reviews (Seikosha AT-100/GP-100 printer), The Atari-Forum, a new tollfree CHAOS dial-up bulletin board, "What is a computer, Part III", hacking a floppy disk drive to fix a warping problem, and much else including a number of pages of advertising. TARICON 83 has a full page ad: "The largest Atari only computer show ever held" and billed as the "First Major Consumer Computer Convention Devoted Exclusively to Atari Home Computeres and related Support Products." with some 50 exhibit booths and 50 seminars and workshops. In addition to Atari news, there is TRS-80, Heath/Zenith and other content.

One issue we looked at discussed networking. One of the most prevalent ones? Sneakernet. Yes, you guessed it. Taking diskettes machine to machine to transfer data. Another lists Current Versions of Apple II software as of Jan 1987. Apple LUG News. Claris tackles a game plan. AppleFest '87. A writer's tool 2 page review of new software from Optimized Systems Software Inc (OSS). OSIG : Patching Wordstar. An explanation of "In the Public Domain" and what it means. You get the idea. Lots of great history.

We've been dealing in computer related material for years, and this is one of the few chances we've had to purchase this sort of early computer group newsletter. While many advertisers remain over the timespan covered, the contents change significantly and are a great source of material for anyone studying this time period in personal computers.

Price: $1,250.00

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