Daguerreotype Saloon. The Subscriber having located his SALOON IN THIS VILLAGE for a short time would take this opportunity to inform the inhabitants of the Village and vicinity that he is now prepared to take ORIGINAL DAGUERREOTYPES, or to Copy Daguerreotypes or Pictures ... [ caption title and text ]. J. A. Foster.
Daguerreotype Saloon. The Subscriber having located his SALOON IN THIS VILLAGE for a short time would take this opportunity to inform the inhabitants of the Village and vicinity that he is now prepared to take ORIGINAL DAGUERREOTYPES, or to Copy Daguerreotypes or Pictures ... [ caption title and text ]
Scarce, only five in Worldcat

Daguerreotype Saloon. The Subscriber having located his SALOON IN THIS VILLAGE for a short time would take this opportunity to inform the inhabitants of the Village and vicinity that he is now prepared to take ORIGINAL DAGUERREOTYPES, or to Copy Daguerreotypes or Pictures ... [ caption title and text ]

Prov. R. I. [ Providence, Rhode Island ]: Henry L. Tillinghast [ circa 1850 ]. First Edition. Broadside. Single leaf, printed on recto only. 6 1/4 x 9 inches (15.8 x 22.9 cm). Wove paper with no watermarks. Cleanly trimmed (with minor variation on upper edge). A nice impression noting some ink ghosting (presumably from other copies printed at the same time). We believe these broadsides were trimmed by the printer and probably printed more than one per sheet, then cut. But there is a single example sold at Cowans we were made aware of with some deckling of the edges. It is noteworthy that the Cowan example has the same dimensions as this broadside (6 1/4 x 9 inches), and hence may have been printed on paper scrap - if that example were trimmed to remove the paper variations, it would have smaller dimensions than this example. But whether printed separately (one per sheet) or multiple per sheet and separated, this is a fine example, a rare addition to any collection of broadsides, technical americana, or photography. Signed in type "J. A. Foster" at base of leaf. An interesting piece of American Typography, with many different typefaces. Fine. [27427]


Very ephemeral, these broadsides had a low survival rate. The photographer would pin them up or circulate in the village they were in, drumming up whatever business they could with this new wonder. Once they left, there was no use for the advertisement anymore. Traveling photographers left less traces of their businesses - even semi-permanent establishments could put advertisements on their photographs, in local papers, etc. The itinerant photographer was just that - moving around constantly. It is a wonder any record survived - and most we find were those presumably successful (or lucky) enough to continue for some time. Or, perhaps the reverse - the condition of this broadside is such that it was likely not circulated.

J. A. Foster left but a few behind, with only five copies in OCLC/Worldcat as of this writing (2 at Harvard, one each at Library of Congress, American Antiquarian Society, and Brown).

Price: $1,750.00